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 If you have loved ones on Japan read this.

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puros_bran
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PostSubject: If you have loved ones on Japan read this.   Mon Mar 14, 2011 1:56 pm

At&t and Verizon have both stated on their Facebook and twitter that they are allowing free calls n text TO Japan until the end of the month.
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puros_bran
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PostSubject: Re: If you have loved ones on Japan read this.   Mon Mar 14, 2011 2:23 pm

Sprint just came on board and said they were waving fees for calls n text too..

I'd advice you to research it for yourself, knowing cell carriers there's got to be a catch somewhere.
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Bub

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PostSubject: Re: If you have loved ones on Japan read this.   Mon Mar 14, 2011 6:06 pm

If your TV picture is provided by ATT Uverse, they have opened a Japanese channel that provides current information...in Japanese
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puros_bran
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PostSubject: Re: If you have loved ones on Japan read this.   Tue Mar 15, 2011 10:22 pm

T-mobile finally followed suit with the other big three and offered free calling and text.
Smaller MetroPCS announced earlier in the day they were too..

Please check their Facebook and/or regular websites before using the service though, I don't know if there are any catches.
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PostSubject: Re: If you have loved ones on Japan read this.   Sat Mar 19, 2011 8:19 pm

Michael Rivero points out that :

Quote :
Stuxnet, a computer virus designed to attack servers isolated from the Internet, such as at power plants, has been confirmed on 63 personal computers in Japan since July, according to major security firm Symantec Corp. In Japan, no public utilities have been affected by the virus. Nevertheless, the Cabinet Office's National Information Security Center has urged electric power companies to exercise extreme care when using USB devices, and to scan any programs that may have been tampered with. (Oct. 5, 2010)
http://www.yomiuri.co.jp/dy/national/T101004003493.htm

1. Israel and the US create Stuxnet.
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/technology-12633240

2. Stuxnet is deployed to wreck Iran's nuclear power station.
http://bigpeace.com/jxenakis/2010/09/27/stuxnet-computer-virus-attacks-irans-bushehr-nuclear-plant/

3. But Stuxnet escapes from its intended target and spreads across Asia
http://www.breitbart.com/article.php?id=CNG.f6fba55ad8f5e329c0c25bad9aa7b8d3.651

4. As the first article documents, Stuxnet was in Japan last October, presumably still spreading and intended to wreck nuclear power plants.

5. Stuxnet targets the Siemens controller
http://www.nytimes.com/2011/01/16/world/middleeast/16stuxnet.html?_r=1&pagewanted=all

6. Fukushima uses the Seimens controllers Stuxnet was designed interfere with.
Quote :
An Australian nuclear physicist says engineers have not given a satisfactory answer as to why the cooling systems at two Japanese power plants are failing.

Japanese authorities say the nuclear reactors at the Fukushima and Onagawa power plants are having cooling problems because of power failures, and there are fears reactors at Fukushima may have already experienced partial meltdowns.

But the former chairman of the Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, Dr Ziggy Switkowski, says it should take more than a loss of power to cause problems with cooling.

"It strikes me as an unsatisfactory explanation," he said. "These reactors have so many levels of back-up that the loss of primary power and then the loss of secondary power shouldn't have been enough to compromise the most critical element of a reactor, which is the cooling system.
http://www.abc.net.au/news/stories/2011/03/14/3163293.htm?section=justin

So now the difficulty the Fukushima nuclear plant operators faced in recovering control over their runaway reactors takes on a darker significance.

Remember that the first problem following the quake was that the automated shutdown systems failed to operate at some of the reactors, because pumps failed and valves would not open even while running on batteries; the very sorts of mischief Stuxnet supposedly was designed to cause at Iran's power station.

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PostSubject: Re: If you have loved ones on Japan read this.   Sun Mar 20, 2011 9:43 am

Wayne Madsden wrote:
If a January 15 report in The New York Times, which has a dubious past in reporting on computer security and hacking issues, is true that the United States Department of Homeland Security, Department of Energy via the Idaho National Laboratory Siemens (which has a long-standing intelligence relationship with the National Security Agency), the CIA, Britain's intelligence services, Germany, and Israel's Mossad cooperated to develop the Stuxnet computer worm to disable Iranian nuclear program centrifuges, the U.S. government violated a number of federal computer security laws that prohibit the development of malicious computer programs that damage ″federal interest″ computers. The Stuxnet worm, which, according to the Times, was tested at Israel's Dimona nuclear weapons development facility in the Negev, not only infected Iranian nuclear program computers but spread to computers in other countries, including the United States. Stuxnet code was discovered through computer forensics to contain key words from the Jewish Old Testament Book of Esther, further establishing Israeli fingerprints on the malicious code. The malicious code's file name, Myrtus, is the Hebrew word for Esther. According to myth, Esther saved the Jews from a Persian plot to exterminate them.

The New York Times article by William Broad, John Markoff, and David Sanger, three reporters who have their own questionable ties to Israeli interests, states that when Stuxnet first appeared around the world in June last year, it did little harm and did not slow computer networks. However, this is merely an attempt to let the U.S. and Israeli governments off the hook by falsely claiming that the only damage done by Stuxnet was to the centrifuge systems used by Iran to enrich uranium. Although Stuxnet likely did disable Iran's centrifuges, causing a set-back to its nuclear program, the Stuxnet worm, contrary to The New York Times report, resulted in computer down time and disruption far beyond Iran. The disruption by a digital version of a U.S. and Israeli military first strike makes the United States government and Israel civilly liable for the damage and disruption caused by Stuxnet.

The involvement of the Homeland Security Department, which includes the U.S. government's National Cyber Security Division that is tasked to protect U.S. ″federal interest″ computer systems from attack, makes the department and Secretary Janet Napolitano criminally culpable in permitting the Development and launch of malicious software that affected U.S. computer systems. If President Obama authorized the Stuxnet deployment through a classified Presidential Finding, he, too, may have committed a crime, an impeachable offense.

As Stuxnet propagated around the world last year, the Homeland Security Department's Industrial Control System-Cyber Emergency Response Team (ICS-CERT) posted a series of alerts and bulletins about the worm. Either ICS-CERT was unaware of its own department's involvement in creating the worm it was warning people about or it was part of a clever disinformation program is unknown, however, some computer security specialists suspected that ICS-CERT was putting out stale information on Stuxnet. On October 3, 2010, the Christian Science Monitor reported that Dale Peterson, the CEO of Digital Bond, a SCADA control systems security company, stated on his blog on September 20, ″It [ICS-CERT's warning alerts] seems to me to have been a delayed clipping service.″

The possible involvement of computer security officials, like Sean McGurk, the DHS's director of the Control System Security Program, in covering up the true origin of Stuxnet, cannot be overlooked. As a founding board member of the International Information System Security Certification Consortium (ISC2), this editor warned against the infiltration of NSA and other intelligence operatives into the computer security profession. The warnings were backed by colleagues from other nations, including Finland and Australia. Placing intelligence operatives inside computer security management positions can always result in the use of computers for sabotage and intelligence. Stuxnet may be the culmination of such infiltration of the computer security profession. In 2000, this editor resigned from the ISC2 board over the acquiescence of the board and consortium to dictates from NSA and other problematic U.S. government agencies. This editor and a minority of board members also disagreed with offering professional certifications to employees of foreign intelligence agencies in countries with abominable human rights and civil liberties records.

Stuxnet was specifically designed to attack supervisory control and data acquisition (SCADA) computer systems. These systems control everything from electrical power grids and chemical processing plants to the computers that operate traffic light and rail systems. Stuxnet disabled SCADA systems not only in Iran but also in India (where India's satellite program may have been severely impacted), Pakistan, Indonesia, Germany, Canada, China, Malaysia, South Korea, Russia, Kazakhstan, United Kingdom, Finland, Saudi Arabia, United Arab Emirates, Qatar, Brazil, Australia, Brunei, Netherlands, Taiwan, Myanmar, Bangladesh, Thailand, Belarus, Denmark, Bahrain, Oman, Kuwait, and the United States. Stuxnet was found on 63 computers in Japan. New Zealand, Japan, and Hong Kong issued alerts about Stuxnet's impact on their SCADA systems. Britain's integrated national rail transport network was reported to be particularly vulnerable to Stuxnet. Turkey reacted to Stuxnet by mandating a ″National Virtual Environment Security Policy.″

By the end of September of last year, over 100,000 computers worldwide had been infected by Stuxnet. So much for The New York Times' specious report that the worm did little damage. Industrial control system security specialists from the chemical, oil, and gas industries expressed concern that the U.S. government was less-than-forthcoming about the effects of Stuxnet on their industries. The computer security firm Symantec appears to have been laundering information to private industry from the government.

The rest is at
http://www.opinion-maker.org/2011/01/stuxnet-a-violation-of-us-computer-security-law/

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PostSubject: Re: If you have loved ones on Japan read this.   Sun Mar 20, 2011 7:21 pm

The radiation level in the Horiguchi installation (Hitachinaka City in Ibaraki Prefecture) has gone from 639 to 2040 in the last 12 hours.

http://www.targetmap.com/viewer.aspx?reportId=4870

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MisterE
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PostSubject: Re: If you have loved ones on Japan read this.   Sun Mar 20, 2011 9:17 pm

This is really starting to get scary...
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