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Sean68

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Age : 49
Location : Berea, Kentucky
Registration date : 2012-06-21

PostSubject: Suck it up!   Mon Sep 10, 2012 8:13 pm

Kaiser83, my good sir, suck it up and get through the class. You will find that more experienced and talented professors teach the higher level classes. The wait will be worth it!

Not that a little ranting and raving isn't good for the psyche. Rant on!
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kaiser83

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Age : 34
Location : Wherever the smoke clears
Registration date : 2012-02-22

PostSubject: Re: College   Mon Sep 10, 2012 8:17 pm

Sean68 wrote:
Kaiser83, my good sir, suck it up and get through the class. You will find that more experienced and talented professors teach the higher level classes. The wait will be worth it!

Not that a little ranting and raving isn't good for the psyche. Rant on!

Sean, smoke a pipe and shut up, I so hate you right now...just kidding Sean, don't kill me please lol. I am getting through it, being my stubborn and ornery self the whole time. Teachers don't like being corrected, but it is fun when you can get them stuttering and back pedaling. I am covering myself as well at the same time by answering questions with the right answers.
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gravel

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Age : 43
Location : Oregon
Registration date : 2011-12-07

PostSubject: Re: College   Mon Sep 10, 2012 8:33 pm

kaiser83 wrote:
Uh....yes???

Oh good. Laughing
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PostSubject: Re: College   Mon Sep 10, 2012 10:32 pm

And while THAT affirmative action shit is going on, the actual "value" of College outside slam-dunk-hire fields like Coppery/Lockup :

(You might not like the link, but the assessment's on the money)

Sarah Kendzior is an anthropologist who recently received her PhD from Washington University in St Louis.

Quote :
It is 2011 and I'm sitting in the Palais ds Congress in Montreal, watching anthropologists talk about structural inequality.

The American Anthropological Association meeting is held annually to showcase research from around the world, and like thousands of other anthropologists, I am paying to play: $650 for airfare, $400 for three nights in a "student" hotel, $70 for membership, and $94 for admission. The latter two fees are student rates. If I were an unemployed or underemployed scholar, the rates would double.

The theme of this year's meeting is "Traces, Tidemarks and Legacies." According to the explanation on the American Anthropological Association website, we live in a time when "the meaning and location of differences, both intellectually and morally, have been rearranged". As the conference progresses, I begin to see what they mean. I am listening to the speaker bemoan the exploitative practices of the neoliberal model when a friend of mine taps me on the shoulder.
"I spent almost my entire salary to be here," she says.

My friend is an adjunct. She has a PhD in anthropology and teaches at a university, where she is paid $2100 per course. While she is a professor, she is not a Professor. She is, like 67 per cent of American university faculty, a part-time employee on a contract that may or may not be renewed each semester. She receives no benefits or health care.

According to the Adjunct Project, a crowdsourced website revealing adjunct wages - data which universities have long kept under wraps - her salary is about average. If she taught five classes a year, a typical full-time faculty course load, she would make $10,500, well below the poverty line. Some adjuncts make more. I have one friend who was offered $5000 per course, but he turned it down and requested less so that his children would still qualify for food stamps.

Why is my friend, a smart woman with no money, spending nearly $2000 to attend a conference she cannot afford? She is looking for a way out. In America, academic hiring is rigid and seasonal. Each discipline has a conference, usually held in the fall, where interviews take place. These interviews can be announced days or even hours in advance, so most people book beforehand, often to receive no interviews at all.

The American Anthropological Association tends to hold its meetings in America's most expensive cities, although they do have one stipulation: "AAA staff responsible for negotiating and administering annual meeting contracts shall show preference to locales with living wage ordinances." This rule does not apply, unfortunately, to those in attendance.

Below poverty line

In most professions, salaries below the poverty line would be cause for alarm. In academia, they are treated as a source of gratitude. Volunteerism is par for the course - literally. Teaching is touted as a "calling", with compensation an afterthought. One American research university offers its PhD students a salary of $1000 per semester for the "opportunity" to design and teach a course for undergraduates, who are each paying about $50,000 in tuition. The university calls this position "Senior Teaching Assistant" because paying an instructor so far below minimum wage is probably illegal.

In addition to teaching, academics conduct research and publish, but they are not paid for this work either. Instead, all proceeds go to for-profit academic publishers, who block academic articles from the public through exorbitant download and subscription fees, making millions for themselves in the process. If authors want to make their research public, they have to pay the publisher an average of $3000 per article. Without an institutional affiliation, an academic cannot access scholarly research without paying, even for articles written by the scholar itself.

It may be hard to summon sympathy for people who walk willingly into such working conditions. "Bart, don't make fun of grad students," Marge told her son on an oft-quoted episode of The Simpsons. "They just made a terrible life choice."

But all Americans should be concerned about adjuncts, and not only because adjuncts are the ones teaching our youth. The adjunct problem is emblematic of broader trends in American employment: the end of higher education as a means to prosperity, and the severing of opportunity to all but the most privileged.

In a searing commentary, political analyst Joshua Foust notes that the unpaid internships that were once limited to show business have now spread to nearly every industry. "It's almost impossible to get a job working on policy in this town without an unpaid internship," he writes from Washington DC, one of the most expensive cities in the country. Even law, once a safety net for American strivers, is now a profession where jobs pay as little as $10,000 a year - unfeasible for all but the wealthy, and devastating for those who have invested more than $100,000 into their degrees. One after another, the occupations that shape American society are becoming impossible for all but the most elite to enter.

The value of a degree

Academia is vaunted for being a meritocracy. Publications are judged on blind review, and good graduate programs offer free tuition and a decent stipend. But its reliance on adjuncts makes it no different than professions that cater to the elite through unpaid internships.

Anthropologists are known for their attentiveness to social inequality, but few have acknowledged the plight of their peers. When I expressed doubt about the job market to one colleague, she advised me, with total seriousness, to "re-evaluate what work means" and to consider "post-work imaginaries". A popular video on post-graduate employment cuts to the chase: "Why don't you tap into your trust fund?"

In May 2012, I received my PhD, but I still do not know what to do with it. I struggle with the closed off nature of academic work, which I think should be accessible to everyone, but most of all I struggle with the limited opportunities in academia for Americans like me, people for whom education was once a path out of poverty, and not a way into it.
 My father, the first person in his family to go to college, tries to tell me my degree has value. "Our family came here with nothing," he says of my great-grandparents, who fled Poland a century ago. "Do you know how incredible it is that you did this, how proud they would be?"

And my heart broke a little when he said that, because his illusion is so touching - so revealing of the values of his generation, and so alien to the experience of mine.
http://www.aljazeera.com/...2012820102749246453.html

What a Face

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PostSubject: Re: College   Tue Sep 11, 2012 8:34 pm

Michael Snyder wrote:
Every single year, millions of young adults head off to colleges and universities all over America full of hopes and dreams. But what most of those fresh-faced youngsters do not realize is that by taking on student loan debt they are signing up for a life of debt slavery. Student loan debt has become a trillion dollar bubble which has shattered the financial lives of tens of millions of young college graduates. 

When you are just starting out and you are not making a lot of money, having to make payments on tens of thousands of dollars of student loan debt can be absolutely crippling. The total amount of student loan debt in the United States has now surpassed the total amount of credit card debt, and student loan debt is much harder to get rid of. Many young people view college as a "five year party", but when the party is over millions of those young people basically end up as modern day serfs as they struggle to pay off all of the debt that they have accumulated during their party years.

Bankruptcy laws have been changed to make it incredibly difficult to get rid of student loan debt, so once you have it you are basically faced with two choices: either you are going to pay it or you are going to die with it.

But we don't warn kids about this before they go to school. We just endlessly preach to them that they need a college degree in order to get a "good job", and that after they graduate they will easily be able to pay off their student loans with the "good job" that they will certainly be able to find.

Sadly, tens of millions of young Americans have left college in recent years only to find out that they were lied to all along.

As I have written about previously, college has become a giant money making scam and the victims of the scam are our young people.

Back in 1952, a full year of tuition at Harvard was only $600.

Today, it is over $35,000.

Why does college have to cost so much?

At every turn our young people are being ripped off.

For example, the cost of college textbooks has tripled over the past decade.

Has it suddenly become a lot more expensive to print books?

Of course not.

Average student loan debt at graduation is estimated to be about $28,720 right now.

That is a crazy figure and it has absolutely soared in recent years. In fact, student loan debt in America has grown by 511 percent since 1999.

And student loan debt will follow you wherever you go.

If you do not pay your loans when you graduate, you could send up having your wages, your tax refunds and even your Social Security benefits garnished . . .
http://www.activistpost.com/2012/09/the-student-loan-debt-bubble-is.html

What a Face

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Kyle Weiss

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Location : Reno, NV
Registration date : 2011-09-18

PostSubject: Re: College   Tue Sep 11, 2012 8:44 pm

Yak's two posts are pretty dead-on. You mix debt with no responsibility of the degree programs (or that of the students themselves; Five Year Party, etc) and no wonder they're painting themselves into a corner, adjuncts and students alike. It's an academic eff-fest, and if you get in the "in circles," do the politics required (both national and school-level) you can get tenured real quick. Too many people I end up talking to with Masters and Doctorates that are practically thankful they have any teaching work at all, and more still that have a simple grocery store job, and could have just gotten that right out of high school without the six-figure debt.

Fortunately, Criminal Justice has a pretty promising outlook for Kaiser. He has a goal, where most students, the degree is the goal. Skills taught, apprenticeships earned and time spent is not profitable, and the schools know it.

Cool
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PostSubject: Re: College   Tue Sep 11, 2012 9:50 pm

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kieveryuu

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Location : Greater Boston
Registration date : 2012-01-07

PostSubject: Re: College   Tue Sep 11, 2012 10:31 pm

I have calculated my debt. And have had to recalculate now that I am at a new school. It is depressing actually. At least I walked into this knowing what I was getting into. My first two semesters I payed for out of pocket. Then all of my saving where gone. Between school and the housing market crash that had me sell my house at a loss I have been dependent on the loan structure to continue on in my education. You catch me at the right time and I can rant on the problems of this structure for a long while. Well, at least, as I said, I walked into this mess knowing what I was getting into and what I was doing on the other side of it. Even so, sometimes it can leave you a little sick in the stomach.
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Megaluddite

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Age : 59
Location : Charlotte, NC
Registration date : 2011-12-07

PostSubject: Re: College   Tue Sep 11, 2012 11:02 pm

I loved my days in undergrad. I new at the time that these were the best times of my life. When I graduated I thought, "I'll never have to take another class as long as I live." It was not three months before I was taking a class just because I wanted to. Stay curious. Hold on to your zest for knowledge. Since my indergrad, I"ve finished one masters and half another (not in that order).

Just remember, a college degree is not techical school. It is a basis for learning the rest of your life.

Good luck! Wink
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Kyle Weiss

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Location : Reno, NV
Registration date : 2011-09-18

PostSubject: Re: College   Tue Sep 11, 2012 11:09 pm

Also, college isn't for everybody, as life is a classroom that only takes short breaks as distractions. Cool

If you ain't learnin', you ain't livin'.
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kieveryuu

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Location : Greater Boston
Registration date : 2012-01-07

PostSubject: Re: College   Wed Sep 12, 2012 2:09 am

Kyle Weiss wrote:
Also, college isn't for everybody, as life is a classroom that only takes short breaks as distractions. Cool

If you ain't learnin', you ain't livin'.

Kyle, that is my line... in that I have always said, "when you stop learning, you stop living."
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kaiser83

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Age : 34
Location : Wherever the smoke clears
Registration date : 2012-02-22

PostSubject: Re: College   Wed Sep 12, 2012 4:33 am

Yes sir Kyle I do most definitely have a goal. I don't "need" college to get into being a police officer most places, but it is definitely a leg up and something to kick my up just a notch above other vets. Eventually I want to become a DNR officer and they are the ones who really tend to want a degree. As for student loans and I......all I have there is GI BILL, I am not paying for college. I would probably pay if I had to, but that would mean me staying in this job longer and this job is definitely not my end goal, it is just a means to the end goal.
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Kyle Weiss

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Location : Reno, NV
Registration date : 2011-09-18

PostSubject: Re: College   Wed Sep 12, 2012 2:26 pm

Kiev: There's a lot of incarnations of that maxim, I just threw my Nevada accent on it and called it good 'n' done. Laughing It's one of my favorites.

Kaiser: Even in a broken system, there's always a workaround, and I think you're going at it the right way. Had you been some starry-eyed fool thinking a $200,000 loan for an "art degree" was going to get you somewhere, then I'd probably facepalm aplenty and try and set you right, but you have a good head on your shoulders. Just watch for the pitfalls, and godspeed--you'll do great.

Cool
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kaiser83

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Age : 34
Location : Wherever the smoke clears
Registration date : 2012-02-22

PostSubject: Re: College   Wed Sep 12, 2012 3:23 pm

Thank you Kyle, I look forward to pulling you over one day. Just FYI tobacco will be accepted as a proper bribe. Kidding of course.
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Kyle Weiss

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Location : Reno, NV
Registration date : 2011-09-18

PostSubject: Re: College   Wed Sep 12, 2012 8:09 pm

As far as the law knows, I'm a clean-record perfect citizen. I'll still sneak up behind you on your cop cycle when you're speed-trapping and throw a bag of tobacco at you and drive off, though. That'd be amusing. Twisted Evil
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kaiser83

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Age : 34
Location : Wherever the smoke clears
Registration date : 2012-02-22

PostSubject: Re: College   Wed Sep 12, 2012 8:12 pm

Cop cycle....I stick to four wheels and no pedals lol. Actually I want to eventually be DNR police so, truck, 4wheeler, boat....all the fun vehicles....and a lot of walking.
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Kyle Weiss

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Location : Reno, NV
Registration date : 2011-09-18

PostSubject: Re: College   Wed Sep 12, 2012 8:16 pm

Fine. I'll leave a trail of donut holes, that lead to a big donut, then have instructions on how to find your tobacco like a treasure map. The outdoors can be entertaining, too.
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kaiser83

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Age : 34
Location : Wherever the smoke clears
Registration date : 2012-02-22

PostSubject: Re: College   Wed Sep 12, 2012 8:19 pm

Yum....donuts. Wait a minute here....why donuts thats too cliche. Can't we go with....uh.....screw it donuts are awesome.
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Kyle Weiss

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Location : Reno, NV
Registration date : 2011-09-18

PostSubject: Re: College   Wed Sep 12, 2012 8:29 pm

Stupid old cliches being true and stuff! Laughing What a Face Enjoy your donuts. Razz
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Sean68

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Age : 49
Location : Berea, Kentucky
Registration date : 2012-06-21

PostSubject: Re: College   Thu Sep 13, 2012 1:51 am

Mmmmmmmm... Donuts!
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kaiser83

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Age : 34
Location : Wherever the smoke clears
Registration date : 2012-02-22

PostSubject: Re: College   Sun Sep 16, 2012 9:06 pm

107 "Um"'s this week. Mad
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PostSubject: Re: College   Mon Sep 17, 2012 5:04 pm

A business partner broke me from saying "um" and "but um" by completing my words with "um - brella" and "but um - bum". It worked. Smile
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