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 Drying tobacco...

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Tilley4

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Location : Tennessee
Registration date : 2016-05-16

PostSubject: Drying tobacco...   Fri Jun 03, 2016 7:59 am

Is there a best way to dry tobacco out? Seems like no matter how long I let some tobacco air dry, it always seems to moist and burns hot and bitter or steams... some of the Boswell aromatics that I have I can sit out one or two days and it's still too moist. Suggestions?
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Cartaphilus

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Age : 63
Location : East Texas
Registration date : 2011-12-15

PostSubject: Re: Drying tobacco...   Fri Jun 03, 2016 10:13 am

A lot of Aro's are pretty soaked and hard to dry out as well as some other tobaccos blends I have in my cellar. But, my suggestion to you, if your not already doing so, is to spread it out thinly on a piece of paper so that all of the tobacco can breath and rub out any that seems to stick together. Let dry for about a half hour and then check it for moisture, if not dry enough, let it set another half hour. It takes time and a lot of patience sometimes to figure out how long a particular tobacco drys to the right moisture level. Some may take hours. I have in the past let it sit under a lamp but, I wouldn't suggest this for it takes away some flavor aspects.You don't want it too dry and you don't want it to wet. I generally check by taking a pinch and rolling it a ball and see how long it takes to spring back/unfold. If it does it the minute I put it down I know it's right for smoking, if it takes a few minutes I know it's too wet yet. That's just how I determine wetness factor and how I dry my wet stuff out, others may have different ideas. Wink
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Richard Burley

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Location : North Coast NY
Registration date : 2011-04-09

PostSubject: Re: Drying tobacco...   Fri Jun 03, 2016 10:42 am

I have trouble with flakes myself. And some aromatics I don't think will ever dry out, due to PG, syrups, etc. I've had stuff stashed in my car in a roll-up pouch that stayed moist through weeks of winter freezes and summers with the windows rolled up, and I can't see much loss of moisture.

And I don't get some guys saying to let flake dry for 15 or 20 minutes. That doesn't do anything, in my experience. It takes days, not minutes. Obviously the humidity in one's environment is a major factor, but even so, the time involved seems understated in most casual references here and elsewhere.

Of course, tobacco that you don't want to dry out will do so almost instantly.
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Cartaphilus

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Age : 63
Location : East Texas
Registration date : 2011-12-15

PostSubject: Re: Drying tobacco...   Fri Jun 03, 2016 10:58 am

Richard Burley wrote:
I have trouble with flakes myself. And some aromatics I don't think will ever dry out, due to PG, syrups, etc. I've had stuff stashed in my car in a roll-up pouch that stayed moist through weeks of winter freezes and summers with the windows rolled up, and I can't see much loss of moisture.

And I don't get some guys saying to let flake dry for 15 or 20 minutes. That doesn't do anything, in my experience. It takes days, not minutes. Obviously the humidity in one's environment is a major factor, but even so, the time involved seems understated in most casual references here and elsewhere.

Of course, tobacco that you don't want to dry out will do so almost instantly.

I think Richard brought up a good pointed how humidity takes a roll in drying tobaccos.
I live in whats looked at as a high humidity climate 80% but, with A/C going 24/7 my indoor humidity
drops to around 60% which is considered comfortable by most. Not knowing your climate there it could take longer or a shorter period of time to dry tobacco properly. All in all it takes as long as it takes
depending on your climate and moisture level of your tobacco. Wink
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oldmansmokingpipe

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Age : 63
Location : US
Registration date : 2016-05-25

PostSubject: Re: Drying tobacco...   Fri Jun 03, 2016 2:22 pm

just my likes and take --- i prefer them moist. Dry tobacco to me seems just too hot and also loses taste and aroma. Reason: drying out tobacco releases the volatile oils which are responsible for the aroma and taste of the tobacco. Cart's idea of thin layer on paper is a good one if that is what you need to do.
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idbowman

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Age : 35
Location : Painesville, OH
Registration date : 2011-12-19

PostSubject: Re: Drying tobacco...   Fri Jun 03, 2016 4:30 pm

+1 to the comments on dry time for flakes and humidity factor.

Some flakes come with more moisture than others, but for the one's requiring the most dry time, I find that overnight in the winter or a climate-controlled summer does the trick. If it's very humid and the AC doesn't keep up with it (or it's early/late enough in the season that we haven't got it running yet), it can take two or three days to my liking.

Aros, you're probably fighting a losing battle if you're looking to get them substantially dried. And, chances are that a lot of when a lot of that moisture dries off, it'll take a fair bit of the added flavor with it.
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Hermit

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Age : 64
Location : Ascension Parish
Registration date : 2008-04-22

PostSubject: Re: Drying tobacco...   Fri Jun 03, 2016 9:12 pm

I use a sheet of paper under a desk lamp for a few minutes.
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Brewdude

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Age : 64
Location : Near the Emerald city
Registration date : 2011-05-04

PostSubject: Re: Drying tobacco...   Fri Jun 03, 2016 10:37 pm

When the sun is bright I just put my rubbed up flakes in a small saucer for a few minutes outside. Use my fingers to see if it's dry enough. Works for me.



Cheers,

RR
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Zeno Marx

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Registration date : 2010-06-26

PostSubject: Re: Drying tobacco...   Sat Jun 04, 2016 3:29 pm

If you're letting it dry for 24-48 hours and still feel it is too moist, you're likely not battling water. You're battling casings, particularly in the aromatic type. I wouldn't think you'd want those gone from the tobacco. You're paying for those flavor casings.

I've only ever had one flake refuse to dry out, and that is McClelland #2035. I sort of like that obstinate aspect, though.
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oldmansmokingpipe

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Age : 63
Location : US
Registration date : 2016-05-25

PostSubject: Re: Drying tobacco...   Sat Jun 04, 2016 4:36 pm

Good Point!!!!
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Brewdude

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Age : 64
Location : Near the Emerald city
Registration date : 2011-05-04

PostSubject: Re: Drying tobacco...   Sat Jun 04, 2016 7:37 pm

Zeno Marx wrote:
If you're letting it dry for 24-48 hours and still feel it is too moist, you're likely not battling water. You're battling casings, particularly in the aromatic type. I wouldn't think you'd want those gone from the tobacco. You're paying for those flavor casings.

I've only ever had one flake refuse to dry out, and that is McClelland #2035. I sort of like that obstinate aspect, though.

In my case, it was MacBaren's Roll Cake back around '01 or so. Left the tin sit out for literally weeks, and it still refused to dry out. One of the only tins I ever trashed!

Suspect


Cheers?

RR
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Tilley4

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Location : Tennessee
Registration date : 2016-05-16

PostSubject: Re: Drying tobacco...   Sun Jun 05, 2016 9:17 am

I laid an aromatic out on paper on the stovetop and turned my oven on yesterday... Definitely dried it out some but as previously stated here, some of the flavoring seemed to dissipate... Catch 22...
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Blackhorse

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Age : 69
Location : Oregon City
Registration date : 2010-10-23

PostSubject: Re: Drying tobacco...   Sun Jun 05, 2016 10:04 am

Two things. 1. If a certain blend is giving you great difficulty in smoking hot due to excessive and persistent moisture...maybe, just maybe, it might be time to throw it far, far away and pick something from the other ten zillion blends available. And 2. Somewhere within the past posts here a brother showed what I thought to be a very sweet drying system. He took a little metal tray and rigged it so it was adjacent to the cooling fan on his computer, the warm air from which blew gently over the moist blend, gradually drying it. It was quite brilliant. And 3. (since we always seek to provide more than promised) it is always prudent to do a good search for prior threads, etc. here on a topic of interest. It is very likely that this has been discussed many times in the past. Just a thought. Good luck and good smokin'.
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Richard Burley

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Location : North Coast NY
Registration date : 2011-04-09

PostSubject: Re: Drying tobacco...   Sun Jun 05, 2016 10:22 am

Zeno Marx wrote:
If you're letting it dry for 24-48 hours and still feel it is too moist, you're likely not battling water. You're battling casings, particularly in the aromatic type. I wouldn't think you'd want those gone from the tobacco...

Memory may fail me, but I think it was FVF that flummoxed me, among others. In any event, I still maintain that it takes days, not minutes. There's a difference between tobacco that has been, say, under a desk lamp for 15 minutes and then feels dry on its surface, and tobacco that has actually dried throughout the little chunks of flake to the point where it will light and burn like decent tobacco. I personally don't like fussing with the process, and will smoke ten bowls of a ribbon-cut blend to one of a flake that I can barely light. FVF, among others, is history with me. And you're right about the essences floating away, in my opinion. Tobacco should come ready to smoke--no aging or drying b.s. The best tobacco comes from Peretti's or Kramer's, in my opinion, and in large cans. (No affiliation, just bias. Wink)
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Blackhorse

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Age : 69
Location : Oregon City
Registration date : 2010-10-23

PostSubject: Re: Drying tobacco...   Sun Jun 05, 2016 10:27 am

Different strokes. I have smoked many, many bowls of FVF and it's brothers and cousins and have had no difficulty lighting it or keeping it lit.
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Richard Burley

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Location : North Coast NY
Registration date : 2011-04-09

PostSubject: Re: Drying tobacco...   Sun Jun 05, 2016 10:35 am

Blackhorse wrote:
Different strokes. I have smoked many, many bowls of FVF and it's brothers and cousins and have had no difficulty lighting it or keeping it lit.

Umm...OK. Cool
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Blackhorse

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Age : 69
Location : Oregon City
Registration date : 2010-10-23

PostSubject: Re: Drying tobacco...   Sun Jun 05, 2016 10:50 am

Your response indicates you doubt my reported experience. But it's accurate. I crush/mash the flakes and top them with a finer litter and fire it all up and go. Many guys roll the flakes like a little log of chewing gum...and once going it burns fine as well they say.

I've really had little to no trouble with any Gawith Flake. Esoterica flakes are a different story...being quite juicy when fresh. But even those, like my beloved Stonehaven are eminently smokable. Perhaps motivation plays a role. Smile
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Richard Burley

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Location : North Coast NY
Registration date : 2011-04-09

PostSubject: Re: Drying tobacco...   Sun Jun 05, 2016 11:13 am

Blackhorse wrote:
Your response indicates you doubt my reported experience...

Not at all, David. I can light and keep the stuff lit myself--at a cost to my oral tissues. I even roll and stuff Mac B's Navy Flake and like it, perhaps because it tastes good, unlike many others worshipped here.
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Zeno Marx

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Registration date : 2010-06-26

PostSubject: Re: Drying tobacco...   Sun Jun 05, 2016 12:02 pm

Richard Burley wrote:
There's a difference between tobacco that has been, say, under a desk lamp for 15 minutes and then feels dry on its surface, and tobacco that has actually dried throughout the little chunks of flake to the point where it will light and burn like decent tobacco.
This reminds me of how to dry bread for bread crumbs. You can leave it out on a cookie sheet, exposed to the air for a day or two, but in that slow process, the cellular walls close and trap some moisture. It feels dry, but it actually isn't. Or you can throw in on the same said cookie sheet in the oven at 250-350 (can't remember right now) for 10-15 minutes, and through that quick process, the walls don't react and thoroughly dry out the bread. The difference is a small amount of moisture, but it is enough to affect some recipes in a bad way.
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Hermit

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Age : 64
Location : Ascension Parish
Registration date : 2008-04-22

PostSubject: Re: Drying tobacco...   Sun Jun 05, 2016 2:48 pm

Richard Burley wrote:
Blackhorse wrote:
Different strokes. I have smoked many, many bowls of FVF and it's brothers and cousins and have had no difficulty lighting it or keeping it lit.

Umm...OK. Cool

If ya wring it out first. Twisted Evil
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