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 Pipe Terminology - Lesson 3

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smoker13



Age : 63
Location : Western Mass
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PostSubject: Pipe Terminology - Lesson 3   Tue Aug 23, 2016 6:48 pm

The Cherrywood. When is a pipe a Cherrywood instead of a Poker or a Sitting Dublin or a .............?
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Brewdude

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PostSubject: Re: Pipe Terminology - Lesson 3   Tue Aug 23, 2016 6:59 pm

My understanding is a Cherrywood has the stem coming up at an angle, and a Poker has the stem coming straight out of the bowl. In both cases the bowl is the same diameter all the way up, and a Dublin is tapered.


HTH


Cheers,

RR
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smoker13



Age : 63
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PostSubject: Re: Pipe Terminology - Lesson 3   Tue Aug 23, 2016 7:58 pm

Ah, but the bowl IS tapered on the Cherrywood pipe, which confuses it with the Dublin.
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Brewdude

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PostSubject: Re: Pipe Terminology - Lesson 3   Tue Aug 23, 2016 8:56 pm

smoker13 wrote:
Ah, but the bowl IS tapered on the Cherrywood pipe, which confuses it with the Dublin.

Guess I haven't seen this particular combination. But there again, style definitions seem to be a function of the carvers in a lot of cases. My observation is only from my limited viewpoint.

Can you give us an example of what you're talking about?



Cheers,

RR
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AJ

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PostSubject: Re: Pipe Terminology - Lesson 3   Tue Aug 23, 2016 9:26 pm

smoker13 wrote:
The Cherrywood.   When is a pipe a Cherrywood instead of a Poker or a Sitting Dublin or a .............?

PM sent! Smile

AJ
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smoker13



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PostSubject: Re: Pipe Terminology - Lesson 3   Tue Aug 23, 2016 9:46 pm

Many Thanks, AJ. I guess it's another example of liberties taken by an artisan with what he/she decides on what the end result of the carving is to be called.

Brewdude, in all honesty I think I've seen more pipes called Cherywoods where the bowl is tapered like a Dublin rather than straight walled. Once I acquire the computer chops that will allow me to send you example pix of what I'm referring to, I will.

s13
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monbla256

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PostSubject: Re: Pipe Terminology - Lesson 3   Tue Aug 23, 2016 11:31 pm

Back in the '70s, the only pipes I ever saw sold as cherrywood pipes were made from Cherrywood, most with the bark on them. The shape of todays briar versions is nearly identical to these older pipes as they had a smaller dia. cherrywood stem inserted at an angle as well. I never saw any briar versions till about a decade ago. Most were made by Ropp. They smoked rather hot and could split the bowl on occasion and were not expensive. Here;s a link to what has trditionaly been known as a Cherrywood pipe.

http://briarfiles.blogspot.com/2008/01/ropp-cherrywood.html
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puros_bran
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PostSubject: Re: Pipe Terminology - Lesson 3   Wed Aug 24, 2016 1:03 am

Brewdude wrote:

style definitions seem to be a function of the carvers in a lot of cases.



Cheers,

RR

I would argue this point. There is a shape chart. Calling a Bulldog a Canadian doesn't magically make it so. It literally seems like every other piper is carving pipes now, and they all want to distinguish themselves from others so they can charge more.
Being creative with the shape chart is not the way to do so in my book. A well respected gentleman in the pipe industry related on site some years back that a Billiard is the absolute hardest shape to perfect, I would not disagree.
Back on topic. A cherrywood sits with the bowl canted with an shank that comes out at around 20 degrees and has a bent stem. A Poker sits flat and has a 45 degree shank with a straight stem. If something deviates to far from this shape it is no longer that shape. It either becomes another shape or it becomes a freehand until it is a generally recognized shape.
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puros_bran
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PostSubject: Re: Pipe Terminology - Lesson 3   Wed Aug 24, 2016 1:05 am

Google Shape chart and click on the 'images' tab. You will see 5,000 pipe charts that agree on pipes shapes and names.
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puros_bran
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PostSubject: Re: Pipe Terminology - Lesson 3   Wed Aug 24, 2016 1:06 am

monbla256 wrote:
Back in the '70s, the only pipes I ever saw sold as cherrywood pipes were made from Cherrywood, most with the bark on them. The shape of todays briar versions is nearly identical to these older pipes as they had a smaller dia. cherrywood stem inserted at an angle as well. I never saw any briar versions till about a decade ago. Most were made by Ropp. They smoked rather hot and could split the bowl on occasion and were not expensive. Here;s a link to what has trditionaly been known as a Cherrywood pipe.

http://briarfiles.blogspot.com/2008/01/ropp-cherrywood.html

I was typing while you were. That is a perfect example of a Cherrywood.
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ftrplt

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PostSubject: Re: Pipe Terminology - Lesson 3   Wed Aug 24, 2016 12:45 pm

puros_bran wrote:
monbla256 wrote:
Back in the '70s, the only pipes I ever saw sold as cherrywood pipes were made from Cherrywood, most with the bark on them. The shape of todays briar versions is nearly identical to these older pipes as they had a smaller dia. cherrywood stem inserted at an angle as well. I never saw any briar versions till about a decade ago. Most were made by Ropp. They smoked rather hot and could split the bowl on occasion and were not expensive. Here;s a link to what has trditionaly been known as a Cherrywood pipe.

http://briarfiles.blogspot.com/2008/01/ropp-cherrywood.html

I was typing while you were.  That is a perfect example of a Cherrywood.

Fully concur Smile I have just one left from a batch of several. Two of the smaller ones finally cracked after much use. The one I have is large with thick walls Very Happy Very Happy cheers FTRPLT
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smoker13



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PostSubject: Re: Pipe Terminology - Lesson 3   Wed Aug 24, 2016 1:33 pm

Whatever the shape, I'm stickin' with briar (unless it's a meer')
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AJ

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PostSubject: Re: Pipe Terminology - Lesson 3   Wed Aug 24, 2016 4:18 pm

smoker13 wrote:
Whatever the shape, I'm stickin' with briar (unless it's a meer')

Wise decision! cheers

AJ
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Brewdude

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PostSubject: Re: Pipe Terminology - Lesson 3   Wed Aug 24, 2016 8:40 pm

I've often found this helpful when classifying shapes-

https://pipedia.org/wiki/Pipe_Shapes



Cheers,

RR
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