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 Interview the poster below you

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Thistleoak

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Age : 35
Location : Northwest Michigan
Registration date : 2012-08-14

PostSubject: Re: Interview the poster below you   Wed Dec 14, 2016 9:50 pm

Vito wrote:
AJ wrote:
...I don't believe purpose is the correct answer to my question.


Brothah AJ: Oops...I guess I didn't understand the point of this thread. Since I chose to answer your question, I thought you were supposed to be interviewing me...you know — asking me what I think. I answered truthfully. The interviewer always has the option of asking for clarification if he doesn't understand the answer, or it doesn't sound quite right to him. That's generally the way an interview works.

For the record, I don't see any inconsistency with my answer and the examples of apparently purposeless behavior you gave in your response.  For a person who lives with the behavior you described, that is his/her purpose. I didn't say the purpose has to be coherent, or well-considered, or rational (much less moral), or even in the best interest of the person who follows it.

Anyhow, it's not a wrong answer. There's a semantic disconnect somewhere. That's what I get for providing the short answer. If you want the long answer, or you want to understand how my answer is actually consistent with the behavior you described, we can take this discussion to another thread.

BTW, I've generally agreed with your posts as well...which is exactly why I suspect this is more a matter of semantic noise than an actual disagreement.  Wink
_________

Here's a question for the next poster: How come people just assume they know what you mean, and don't even bother to ask whether their assumptions are correct?

I believe you are both correct as my answer to that question is different as well.  Some questions cannot be answered for everyone but singly an individual can speak for themselves
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AJ

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Age : 68
Location : East of the Rocky Mountains
Registration date : 2012-03-18

PostSubject: Re: Interview the poster below you   Wed Dec 14, 2016 11:34 pm

Vito I've continued this discussion in the Rubber Room. Please respond to my latest post there.

A thousand pardons to the OP if I've somehow caused any problems or done something inappropriate. It was unintentional. Smile

AJ
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Ozark Wizard

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Age : 53
Location : Mark Twain National Forest, MO
Registration date : 2014-10-11

PostSubject: Re: Interview the poster below you   Wed Dec 14, 2016 11:40 pm

AJ wrote:
Vito I've continued this discussion in the Rubber Room. Please respond to my latest post there.

A thousand pardons to the OP if I've somehow caused any problems or done something inappropriate. It was unintentional. Smile

AJ

Good show AJ, and thanks....
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Eric Furgeson

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Age : 51
Location : Tacoma, WA. U.S.A. Planet Earth, Milky Way, Galxie
Registration date : 2016-04-21

PostSubject: Re: Interview the poster below you   Sat Dec 17, 2016 7:22 pm

Sadly it looks as though this thread was accidently steered off course. So in an effort to help bring it back in line I wil askl the next poster this. What is the most life conferming thing you have ever experanced and how did it affect you long term?
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Stick

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Age : 47
Location : 'Blighty'
Registration date : 2014-02-19

PostSubject: Re: Interview the poster below you   Sat Dec 17, 2016 7:44 pm

To answer AJ's question first...

...to make way for Wednesday.

Now yours Eric...

... having children. The experience has highlighted a completely new set of priorities and has been an education in tolerance, giving and self reflection.

My question. If you could give any gift at Christmas what would it be and to whom?
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Ozark Wizard

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Age : 53
Location : Mark Twain National Forest, MO
Registration date : 2014-10-11

PostSubject: Re: Interview the poster below you   Sat Dec 17, 2016 8:28 pm

Stick wrote:
To answer AJ's question first...

...to make way for Wednesday.

Now yours Eric...

... having children. The experience has highlighted a completely new set of priorities and has been an education in tolerance, giving and self reflection.

My question.  If you could give any gift at Christmas what would it be and to whom?

I would give peace of heart and mind to those who feel neither..

My question:

When faced with a potential 'Check' of your king(chess), is it good form to attempt to 'castle' your king, or employ Rooks and Knights to remove the aggressor's threat?
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Eric Furgeson

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Age : 51
Location : Tacoma, WA. U.S.A. Planet Earth, Milky Way, Galxie
Registration date : 2016-04-21

PostSubject: Re: Interview the poster below you   Sat Dec 17, 2016 9:07 pm

Ozark Wizard wrote:
Stick wrote:
To answer AJ's question first...

...to make way for Wednesday.

Now yours Eric...

... having children. The experience has highlighted a completely new set of priorities and has been an education in tolerance, giving and self reflection.

My question.  If you could give any gift at Christmas what would it be and to whom?

I would give peace of heart and mind to those who feel neither..

My question:

When faced with a potential 'Check' of your king(chess), is it good form to attempt to 'castle' your king, or employ Rooks and Knights to remove the aggressor's threat?
I don't know if would say it is bad form to castle. However when my opponet does it during a match I see it as more of an act of desperation then stratigic game play. As to the employment of rooks and knights to remove the aggressor that is often part of my stratigy. To draw them forth so I may remove their piece from play. After all a weakened opponet is more likely to fall. I will admint in an ideal game there should be victory with a minimum of pieces los. Sadly my skills are not at that level so I must play the strongest game I can.

Now for the next person. What would you say was the most difficult and rewarding age for you thus far in your life?
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Stick

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Age : 47
Location : 'Blighty'
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PostSubject: Re: Interview the poster below you   Tue Dec 20, 2016 4:57 pm

Mmm, most difficult age would have to be when I was about 41.  I was in a really bad place; trying to balance an overly demanding career with a young family (and failing) led to myself and my wife being very unwell and challenged the very integrity of our family unit.  Most rewarding has to be now (46).  Gaining my Masters' degree in Leadership a few years ago has opened new doors.  I've now 'retired' from one career and started another.  No longer faced with having to move every few years we've finally been able to buy our own home so we're settled with a huge feeling of everything coming together.  It's been a long difficult path, but we're now reaping the reward.

My question:  Speaking of leadership, who in your view has been the greatest leader of all time (non religious please) and why?
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Eric Furgeson

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Age : 51
Location : Tacoma, WA. U.S.A. Planet Earth, Milky Way, Galxie
Registration date : 2016-04-21

PostSubject: Re: Interview the poster below you   Sun Jan 01, 2017 6:29 pm

Stick wrote:
Mmm, most difficult age would have to be when I was about 41.  I was in a really bad place; trying to balance an overly demanding career with a young family (and failing) led to myself and my wife being very unwell and challenged the very integrity of our family unit.  Most rewarding has to be now (46).  Gaining my Masters' degree in Leadership a few years ago has opened new doors.  I've now 'retired' from one career and started another.  No longer faced with having to move every few years we've finally been able to buy our own home so we're settled with a huge feeling of everything coming together.  It's been a long difficult path, but we're now reaping the reward.

My question:  Speaking of leadership, who in your view has been the greatest leader of all time (non religious please) and why?


I have given this a lot of thought and have to say this is a very tough question. But I think I would have to say in my opinion it was George Washington. Because he not only managed to hold his armies together and achive victory over what was at the time the worlds greatset army. He also stepped down from power when he could have truely become a king. He set the example that helped form so much of this nations early history. He was far from purfect and there is much that could be said about him that detracts from the common historical view of him. Still in the end he allowed the power he spent years seaking to pass from him. I find this to be the mark of true leadership. Knowing when it is time to withdraw from power before you do damage to that which you worked to build.

Now my question for the next person in line is. What would you identify as the most important advancement of the human race in the last 100 years and why?
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Stick

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Age : 47
Location : 'Blighty'
Registration date : 2014-02-19

PostSubject: Re: Interview the poster below you   Sat Jan 07, 2017 3:09 pm

Eric, I'd love to answer with something very profound but think I'll have to settle on the silicon chip. Why? Because they've been pivotal in advancing technology to the extent we see today. The advancement has been truly mind blowing. Even the act of posting this reply is reliant on them!

My question: What is your fondest memory from your school years?
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Old Nate
Not Really Old
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Age : 34
Location : Western PA
Registration date : 2014-08-27

PostSubject: Re: Interview the poster below you   Fri Jan 13, 2017 2:40 pm

I'll add a different perspective to this thread:

My greatest memory from school days... I was 18 and played on a terrible baseball team. Always considered myself to be a pretty good athlete and of course I had overzealous dreams of one day playing professional baseball... I was that good, or at least I thought so. The fact that this team was terrible, however, brought me down a peg and as I slowly understood that those last set of games I was playing when I was 18 would likely be my last, it hit hard. Anyway, I was pitching... we were losing 9-0 and just as it seemed nothing was going our way we started to climb back in that game. We chipped away. Started to actually play baseball, and in the process ended up getting the lead in the last inning by way of me stealing home. One of the few stolen bases I ever had... in the bottom of the inning I (still pitching) took the mound and struck out the last batter on my 176th pitch of the game. Nearly 16 years ago they only had an inning limit... regardless, it was just another game, but it was me at my best, not quitting, giving everything I had to a sport I loved. I'll never forget the look on my dad's face when I threw that last pitch.

My Question:
If you had the patience, time, and skill to write a novel, what would it be about, who would the main character be, and is he/she someone that mirrors your own life?
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Lesath

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Location : The Ozarks
Registration date : 2011-07-22

PostSubject: Re: Interview the poster below you   Mon Jan 30, 2017 4:08 am

I'll bite on that, as I'd previously answered on favorite books, ah the literary world!

I'd toyed with this, per the request of two very dear friends. I've outlined it, drafted some portions of it, yet I do not have the strength to actually proceed any further. I once married into a very nice family. They were good people, they touched lives gently and in quiet ways. In the fullness of time, the mother and father became quite elderly, and died under our care. Then out of the blue, my wife became terminally ill. She was so strong and young for her age. We'd always been quite something, but in her last two years we became something far more. She died peacefully at home, just us together. We walked into the valley of the shadow together, and we had to part ways. Then, her sister died, and now that beautiful little family is gone. They live in my memories, and I'll make this post my homage to them, and thus the "great"novel. The story doesn't quite end there though. After quite a few years, two lives intersected and discovered they could both live again--thus a new Mrs Lesath, and another life to experience. So, the main character should perhaps be the pertinence of our life experiences, how they mold and change us, and how perhaps we need to above all be patient and see where life takes us. But NEVER forget.

So I ask the next of our brethren, what is your favorite holiday and why?
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Brewdude

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Age : 64
Location : Near the Emerald city
Registration date : 2011-05-04

PostSubject: Re: Interview the poster below you   Sat Feb 25, 2017 9:45 pm

Lesath wrote:
So I ask the next of our brethren, what is your favorite holiday and why?

Les, I guess you mean Christmas, Thanksgiving, or something, right? Frankly I don't have one. And not to be disrespectful, but I don't celebrate or observe any commonly recognised holiday.

Not a religious, political, or otherwise held belief. Too difficult to explain here, so I won't. I just don't. Maybe that sounds hard, but there it is.

So my question to the next poster is this-


What was your favourite car that you owned, and why? Pics appreciated.


Cheers,

RR
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Eric Furgeson

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Age : 51
Location : Tacoma, WA. U.S.A. Planet Earth, Milky Way, Galxie
Registration date : 2016-04-21

PostSubject: Re: Interview the poster below you   Sat Feb 25, 2017 11:04 pm

Brewdude wrote:
What was your favourite car that you owned, and why? Pics appreciated.
Cheers, RR
I would have to say my favorite car was my 1964 ford falcon sprint. It was a two door hard top with a 289 and three speed in it. Black with a red and white interior.  It was my first car. When I bought it in 1979 it was setting a horse pasture and had been for 6 or 7 years there where actually two of them out there and I bought them both for four hundred dollars. The one had been wreaked and was only good as a doaner car. My Brother in law and I spent the next two years rebuilding the car. You know body work, paint job, new interior. Setting that engine up so it ran like a milk fed kitten purrs.by the time I was 16 and old enough to drive it was like a new car. God I loved that car. But two years later I got into some legal troubles as had to sell it to cover my fines and legal fees. I have done my best to aviod that type of behavior since. Because sure I regret what I did but selling that car still hurts to this day. Sadly as for showing pictures. My exwife got rid of them. Or at least I think she did I never saw them after we split up.



Now for my question to the next person in line. What is your favorite song or piece of music and why? Also please share your favorite memory that it invokes.
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Brewdude

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Location : Near the Emerald city
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PostSubject: Re: Interview the poster below you   Sun Feb 26, 2017 8:49 pm

Eric Furgeson wrote:
Now for my question to the next person in line. What is your favorite song or piece of music and why? Also please share your favorite memory that it invokes.

On the basis of how many times I've listened to it and the influence it had upon me as a musician, composer, guitarist, and music lover in general - hands down it would be "Thick as a Brick" by Jethro Tull.

I'd been a Tull fan for several years starting with "Stand Up" when this groundbreaking work came out in '72. I bought it as soon as it was in the record stores on the strength of their other albums, but not knowing anything about it. It was just released and there wasn't yet any chatter from the music rags.

At first I didn't quite know what to make of it, as each side of the album (this was vinyl of course) had no individual track grooves as one would normally see. What I didn't realize, of course, was that this was, in fact, one continuous song of some 43 minutes or so with no individual selections with short periods of silence between them.

Equally, it soon became apparent that this was a "concept album" with a story line that weaved in and out of the sections as they appeared and re-appeared in slightly different forms, meters, or keg sigs. This was very interesting to me as a musician of many years, since I was familiar with Classical forms and how they developed the sections and re-stated them to strengthen the main melody.

Plus, this new form of progressive rock had found a willing listener through Tull, ELP, and Yes, to name but a few. In short I found I enjoyed layered, complex and challenging music.

All to say, that TAAB changed the musical landscape for me in a very profound way as it influenced my development as a musician from that period in a way that no other work or group had ever done.

In fact, one of my own compositions from that period is a direct influence that TAAB had upon me. Back in the day my group named it "The Symphony" and while we failed to bring it to fruition for audiences due to various reasons, I endeavoured to bring it to a conclusion after re-uniting with 3 of the original 4 band members some 30+ years later.

This work can be found on my website for free download-

www.randereed.com

And while some of the tracks are somewhat, shall we say, unpolished (ahem), it does rather capture the excitement and energy the work was meant to do. I do have it in mind to re-mix this at some point in order to correct the embarrassing moments here and there, but at that time I was at the mercy of the studio and technology available to me. Not an excuse, just a statement of fact.

Yes, the music of Tull and Ian Anderson in particular has had a very profound effect upon me. To date, I've studied no other composer so closely nor learned more more songs from. And while that's been of service to me in many ways, I also don't strive to parrot his style, apart from a lark occasionally. After all, Ian Anderson created his own signature, and so should I.

Yes, this is all TMI. More than you all bargained for, no doubt. But if you've persevered, my heartfelt thanks as I've never bared my soul in this fashion previously. Must be the 3 pints speaking, with the 4th calling........


So, my question to the next poster is this-

If you could have lived in a different period/century what would it be and why?



Cheers,

RR
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arkansaspiper

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Age : 26
Location : some where in a galaxy far far away
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PostSubject: Re: Interview the poster below you   Sun Feb 26, 2017 10:56 pm

I think i would have two I'm not sure I could pick one but.. 1800s or ww2 Era.  Reason being I wanted to experience the civil war  in many aspects and many aspects of ww2. Just because a book dose not do it justice.  I would also like to talk to the men in those two eras of the time at the time of it happening

Next qestion
If there was one weapon of any Era country or time  you want to own what would it be and why?


Last edited by arkansaspiper on Sun Feb 26, 2017 11:46 pm; edited 2 times in total
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Eric Furgeson

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PostSubject: Re: Interview the poster below you   Sun Feb 26, 2017 11:21 pm

Given that I was interested in hearing your answer to my query ( which might I add was both heartfelt and informitive) and that this is something I have pondered often while enjoy a pipe and a pint on a soft evening . I shall jump right back in and respond to your question. I would choose the 1870's here in the USA. it is post civil war and pre heavy industralization. During that peroid a man could go as far as his skills and talents would take him. Yes there was larger differences between the triers in socioty but those bold and brash enough could build any type of life they desired. As a period it was resting on the cusp of greatness yet still allowed for the spirit of exploration and expansion.  There where still frontiers and room for freeminded people to grow and develope both communities and this nation.I like to think that given these factors and my ability to develope diverse skill sets for jobs that require the use of ones hands. I could have built an honest business that would allow me to support myself and those I chose to share my life with a good living. Pluse given it was before the time of Big Government and it's attempts to control so much of our lives. I can not help but feel it was the America I envision when I think of a true peroid of independence and freedom.


Now because I find this question so interesting and would so enjoy hearing others views on it.I shall repeat Brewdude's question for the next person in line. If you could choose another time, period, or centery to live in when would it be and why?
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Eric Furgeson

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PostSubject: Re: Interview the poster below you   Sun Feb 26, 2017 11:25 pm

Sorry arky! I must have been typing mine up when you posted your's so out of fairness to you I would ask that the next poster please respond to Arkansas's question instead of mine.
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arkansaspiper

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PostSubject: Re: Interview the poster below you   Sun Feb 26, 2017 11:28 pm

No no my friend, it will come when the time is right. And thank you I'm am but small part of something that I have had no part in to this point. Just wanted to try my hand.
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Eric Furgeson

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PostSubject: Re: Interview the poster below you   Sun Feb 26, 2017 11:35 pm

arkansaspiper wrote:
No no my friend, it will come when the time is right.  And thank you I'm am but small part of something that I have had no part in to this point. Just wanted to try my hand.
And your very willingness to participate in this venture is why I am more them happy to yield this rounds question to you my friend. And I feel it would be highly unfair if your inquiry was over looked because of my actions.
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Brewdude

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PostSubject: Re: Interview the poster below you   Sat Apr 22, 2017 7:44 pm

Eric Furgeson wrote:
Now because I find this question so interesting and would so enjoy hearing others views on it.I shall repeat Brewdude's question for the next person in line. If you could choose another time, period, or centery to live in when would it be and why?

Since this thread has been languishing for some time, I'll respond with the view to moving the topic forward.

I'd find it interesting to have lived in the Dickensian period in England. That is, if I could have found it to be in the classes above the poor yet below the gentry. And while there wasn't a middle class as such there are a multitude of employments that could interest me and provide a reasonable way of life.

Yes of course brewing ale comes to mind first and foremost. And though this was before the advent of scientific methods and understanding the principles remain much the same.

The downsides are many - lack of qualified medical practitioners and shorter life span as a result as one example. And the laws that were in force at the time elicited the most exacting penalties for even the most trivial of offences. And the class system was fully in force. So there is that.

All that notwithstanding, it would have been an interesting and challenging time to live.

Now for the next poster-

Tell us of your best year and what it entailed.


Cheers,

RR
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Ozark Wizard

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Age : 53
Location : Mark Twain National Forest, MO
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PostSubject: Re: Interview the poster below you   Sun Apr 23, 2017 1:07 am

I suppose my best year was when I was born. It gave me the opportunity to meet all the things or people and try all the things that I have done. What a ride!
P
I believe it started with a Hershey bar in my father's back pocket. If I go into too much detail this might end up in the rubber room......



So my question for the next poster is,

How would you feel your life would be different if you were born the other gender?
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Richard Burley

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Location : North Coast NY
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PostSubject: Re: Interview the poster below you   Sun Apr 23, 2017 9:24 am

Ozark Wizard wrote:
...How would you feel your life would be different if you were born the other gender?

Easy. I'd be gay.

Question: Anyone ever had a teacher or mentor (in any form) that "inspired" you? Or are you pretty much sui generis?
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Brewdude

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Age : 64
Location : Near the Emerald city
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PostSubject: Re: Interview the poster below you   Sun Apr 23, 2017 11:26 am

I've had several guitar instructors who were an inspiration to me and a mentor as well. The first one was my original teacher Dave Sherry who introduced me to first bass and later 6-string and who was like the older brother I never had. The second was Wayne Reese who was a gifted guitarist and who could play any style well. He was also instrumental in my development in more ways than music.

My question - if you could have one thing to do over in your life what would it be?


Cheers,

RR
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Richard Burley

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PostSubject: Re: Interview the poster below you   Sun Apr 23, 2017 2:39 pm

Brewdude wrote:
My question - if you could have one thing to do over in your life what would it be?

Finish college, with the stipulation that I know what I know now. Otherwise, no deal. I value my mind too much.

Q: If you could live 500 years, could you adjust and be happy? You know, what with friends and relatives dying, changing mores, and all that stuff?
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