HomeHome  CalendarCalendar  FAQFAQ  SearchSearch  RegisterRegister  MemberlistMemberlist  UsergroupsUsergroups  Log in  
Share | 
 

 Piping Quirks

View previous topic View next topic Go down 
AuthorMessage
Dorchester

avatar

Age : 36
Registration date : 2017-09-12

PostSubject: Piping Quirks   Mon Nov 06, 2017 5:35 pm

So, I've had the good fortune of adding one to my collection. In this case a Peterson Aran 01 that I grabbed on eBay for a reasonable price. Unsmoked estate.

And either I'm losing my mind, or this thing smokes wet. Do you gents find that a tobacco needs more or less drying time depending on what you're smoking it in? Because by the time I get down to the last quarter on this thing, it is audibly sizzling. It's pretty wild. I've never experienced that in a cob or in the other briars I've tried.

Incidentally, I thought I'd try my hand at restoration, so I grabbed a Sav Dry System 2614 in need of some love. I'll give you all a good cringe and post about my amateur restoration skills later, but I want to say: That thing smokes like a dream.
Back to top Go down
View user profile
Lonecoyote

avatar

Location : The Seventh Planet From The Sun...Uranus
Registration date : 2016-10-15

PostSubject: Re: Piping Quirks   Mon Nov 06, 2017 6:30 pm

I don't have any experience with the Pete you purchased but I will say...each pipe smokes differently. Depending on the briar and the mechanics of the pipe. I've also noticed this on two different MM Country Gentleman pipes I recently purchased. One had a nice size draft that smoked cool with clouds of smoke and the other smoked so bad I twisted the shank up and back in a circular motion until it was removed. I opened the draft and now the pipe smokes perfect. This can happen on an expensive pipe as well as a el-cheapo! My $165.00 RDPipes Devil Anse out performs my $600.00 Eltang Devil Anse in every way imaginable. Only reason I've not sold the Eltang is because it was a gift from a close friend. Other then that, any pipe I smoke a few times and realize it will most likely never smoked by me again....it goes up on eBay. Someone else might think it's one of the best smokers in their collection. Tobacco as well as pipes is extremely subjective.



KEEP ON PUFFING!!!
Back to top Go down
View user profile
huffelpuff

avatar

Age : 47
Location : Laramie, WY
Registration date : 2011-12-10

PostSubject: Re: Piping Quirks   Mon Nov 06, 2017 8:10 pm

Yes the pipe can make a huge difference. Is it a fishtail or a p lip? If its a fishtail its usually a matter of opening up the draft just a hair. It doesn't take much either so if you do open it up go slow open it up one size and then smoke it. See how it does before you go up another notch. I don't recommend you go over 4mm. I will have to look and see what that is in SAE. If its a p lip you may not be able to much to open it up. It depends on a lot of factors.

Jim
Back to top Go down
View user profile
KevinM



Age : 74
Location : Connecticut
Registration date : 2012-02-26

PostSubject: Re: Piping Quirks   Mon Nov 06, 2017 9:11 pm

Does the air channel enter the bowl at the very bottom, or is there a gap between the air hole and the bowl floor? I’ve had a “wet pipe” (though not a Pete) that had a conspicuous gap, and it smoked w e t. My remedy was to stop smoking when it began to get soggy. I was told that pipe mud was a better remedy.
Back to top Go down
View user profile
Lonecoyote

avatar

Location : The Seventh Planet From The Sun...Uranus
Registration date : 2016-10-15

PostSubject: Re: Piping Quirks   Mon Nov 06, 2017 9:57 pm

If the issue is only a gap from the draft hole to the bottom of the chamber that can be remedied by building up the bottom of the chamber with pipe mud. Worked for me but remember never scrape the bottom of the bowl with a pipe tool. I use a small piece of rolled paper towel to clean the chamber after each use. After each pipe I enjoy I use paper towel to keep the chamber clean and build an even cake. Then clean the stem with a soft pipe cleaner and the draft hole with a bristle pipe cleaner. Guess I over do it, but I've always done the same from the first pipe I smoked in October of '68, and that was one of my grandfathers old Medico pipes. I started cleaning pipes that way I guess because my grandfather ( my Moms Dad, not a nice guy! ) kept his pipes nasty. Now my Dads father was a perfectionist, wonder where I get it from...lol.



KEEP ON PUFFING!!!
Back to top Go down
View user profile
Blackhorse
Moderator
avatar

Age : 69
Location : Oregon City
Registration date : 2010-10-23

PostSubject: Re: Piping Quirks   Mon Nov 06, 2017 10:44 pm

Agree. The draft and the pathway that the smoke has to travel through makes all the difference. Especially if there is an offset somewhere along the way, it could provide a point at which condensation might occur. I have seen and owned Pete’s in which the bore in the stem was Way Offset from the bore in the shank. So the smoke had to make two 90 degree turns to get out. Gurgled like crazy. I think this is why everyone wants a pipe in which a cleaner will pass easily and completely. It shows a straight draft pathway.

_________________
Council Member, Trading Post & General Site Moderator.
Founding BoB Bombers Squadron Commander, Ret. 
Back to top Go down
View user profile
Dorchester

avatar

Age : 36
Registration date : 2017-09-12

PostSubject: Re: Piping Quirks   Tue Nov 07, 2017 1:47 pm

You guys are good.

Indeed, the draft hole is off. Instead of being centered in the shank, it's rather a little higher-up. A pipe cleaner definitely does not pass straight through.

Also, since it's a Pete, how do I tell if it's carbonized or dip-stained? It looks carbonized to my untrained eye, but it tastes... off. Then again, 2 bowls into it, the character of the bowl hasn't changed much. It's still pretty black,
Back to top Go down
View user profile
Blackhorse
Moderator
avatar

Age : 69
Location : Oregon City
Registration date : 2010-10-23

PostSubject: Re: Piping Quirks   Tue Nov 07, 2017 2:03 pm

Dorchester wrote:
You guys are good.

Indeed, the draft hole is off. Instead of being centered in the shank, it's rather a little higher-up. A pipe cleaner definitely does not pass straight through.

Also, since it's a Pete, how do I tell if it's carbonized or dip-stained? It looks carbonized to my untrained eye, but it tastes... off. Then again, 2 bowls into it, the character of the bowl hasn't changed much. It's still pretty black,

No clue on this one. Sorry. You might try some of the more experienced guys here that do refurbing...like Ocelot (Jesse) of Blue Room Briars. There are others that are known for their excellent work too. Just scroll the posts and look at the refurb threads and PM the author. Try in Pipes and in DIY sections. Good luck.

_________________
Council Member, Trading Post & General Site Moderator.
Founding BoB Bombers Squadron Commander, Ret. 
Back to top Go down
View user profile
MisterE
Moderator
avatar

Location : Mexico City
Registration date : 2009-08-24

PostSubject: Re: Piping Quirks   Tue Nov 07, 2017 3:01 pm

If it is a relatively new pipe, chances are it was dip stained. With Petersons I like to remove the precarbonized coating and sand the chamber bowl down to the wood before getting started. In general, new Petes tend to take a long time to break in. But when they hit their stride, they can be amazing. I know yours is an estate, but it might be worth a try anyway.

The last Pete (264 Donegal) I bought, I tried breaking it in as is. Total failure! I then scraped off the precarb and sanded it down and started over. Today it's one of my best pipes, misdrilling and all.

_________________
Many of the greatest pleasures in life are illegal, immoral, or smelly.

-Yak
Back to top Go down
View user profile
Ocelot55

avatar

Location : Columbus, OH
Registration date : 2012-03-28

PostSubject: Re: Piping Quirks   Tue Nov 07, 2017 7:22 pm

Dorchester wrote:
Also, since it's a Pete, how do I tell if it's carbonized or dip-stained? It looks carbonized to my untrained eye, but it tastes... off. Then again, 2 bowls into it, the character of the bowl hasn't changed much. It's still pretty black,

Peterson has finished the inside of their bowls many different ways. Sometimes this depends on the specific line. Higher end pipes might have no bowl coating whatsoever. I own several modern Aran finish Peterson pipes, and on all of them the bowl had been dip stained. The interior of the bowl can easily be sanded out by a qualified restoration expert if it bothers you. That will probably make the pipe easier to break in as well, although, like any uncoated bowl, wouldn't have any protection against burnout. Of course as long as you're careful in the initial break in process it shouldn't matter.
Back to top Go down
View user profile http://www.jonespipes.com
smoker13



Age : 63
Location : Western Mass
Registration date : 2016-01-12

PostSubject: Re: Piping Quirks   Mon Nov 13, 2017 1:03 pm

Here's something from a completely different angle and it may very well sound completely off-the-wall, and thus be completely WRONG, but.........here goes;

Your use of the word "sizzling" combined with smoking at the bottom of the bowl gave rise to this; is the bowl very hot when this happens? If so, is there a faint smell of wood mixed with the smell of tobacco? What I'm getting at is that the chance that the new pipe, which has not built jup any cake yet, just might be burning at the heel.

Like I implied, this is from a completely different angle than previous posts, but well, I just figured I'd mention it, wacky or not, because it CAN be an occurrence with new pipes and avid smoking.

And absolutely no arrows shot your way in this post, brother, so please don't get the wrong impression that I'm saying you're doing something wrong.
Back to top Go down
View user profile
 
Piping Quirks
View previous topic View next topic Back to top 
Page 1 of 1

Permissions in this forum:You cannot reply to topics in this forum
Brothers of Briar :: Pipes & Tobacco :: Ye Olde Pipe Rack-
Jump to: