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 In praise of English Cheese

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Brewdude
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PostSubject: In praise of English Cheese   Sun Feb 25, 2018 8:56 pm

After an expedition to a certain import food shop in downtown Seattle yesterday (yes I know, it was indeed out of my "normal" bounds of behaviour - heh!), I acquired the following luscious comestibles-

Mature English Cheddar - almost white in colour and very firm.

Stilton (of course) The King of Cheese!

Sage Derby (pronounced "Darby") which is greenish from the addition of sage and kind of mild and semi-hard with the unmistakeable flavour of sage.

Cotswold (an old favourite) which is Double Gloucester w/chives and Spring Onions (has kind of a "bite" to it).

They didn't have any Wensleydale unfortunately. This is produced in the Yorkshire Dales and is mild and very creamy with a crumbly texture. They've had it it in the past but not yesterday.

So I got a generous wedge of each, and had the mature Cheddar yesterday and today. Have to report that it was outstanding in all ways. Had that "squeaky" quality, if you know what I mean.

I'll chime in on the others in due course. Suffice to say that English cheeses rate very highly with me. And these were only a few of the offerings I was presented with.

Your cheese preferences?


Cheers,

RR

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Richard Burley

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PostSubject: Re: In praise of English Cheese   Sun Feb 25, 2018 9:39 pm

One of my favorite indulgences, if accompanied with wine and crackers, right up there with chocolate and tree nuts. Can't say I've narrowed my tastes down to anything special, other than maybe brie. Just had Stilton for the first time a few weeks ago. Plenty good.
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BriarPipeNYC



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PostSubject: Re: In praise of English Cheese   Mon Feb 26, 2018 8:57 am

Love trying different cheeses.  

The FDA is about to revamp all the rules that regulate the aging, and the using of raw-milk (unpasteurized) when making cheese.  Not good.


Frank
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huffelpuff

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PostSubject: Re: In praise of English Cheese   Mon Feb 26, 2018 5:23 pm

Big fan of the English cheeses here. The Wenslydale is a particular favorite. Quite of of some of the Irish cheeses as well.

Frank NYC, Any time the FDA pokes their noses in its going to end badly I'm afraid. Especially for anything raw milk.

Jim
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Ozark Wizard

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PostSubject: Re: In praise of English Cheese   Mon Feb 26, 2018 8:09 pm

BriarPipeNYC wrote:
Love trying different cheeses.  

The FDA is about to revamp all the rules that regulate the aging, and the using of raw-milk (unpasteurized) when making cheese.  Not good.


Frank
NYC

5) I'm off to the rubber room.....

Oh, oh, cheese....

Jarlsburg Swiss is top dog in my book. And yes, anything that makes my teeth squeek. When enjoying a nice Cabernet, many havarti cheeses and sharp Cheddars. Got my hands on some crazy Black label Tillamook sharp that cleared my nose like mentholated snuff! Ammonia city! Now THAT was a minute ago......
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Brewdude
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PostSubject: Re: In praise of English Cheese   Mon Feb 26, 2018 8:59 pm

huffelpuff wrote:
Big fan of the English cheeses here. The Wenslydale is a particular favorite. Quite of of some of the Irish cheeses as well.

Frank NYC, Any time the FDA pokes their noses in its going to end badly I'm afraid. Especially for anything raw milk.

Jim

Great to know you're a kindred spirit Jim. I've also had it with the addition of cranberries, walnuts, and whatnot. But the regular is fine enough for me. It has such a delicate flavour that doesn't want to be adulterated IMHO.

And yass.. anytime the friggin' FDA sticks it's nose into anything normally spells trouble ahead. But that's not for this thread. I'd only ask that this is for the discussion of English Cheese!

And speaking of that, where is his Lordship Stick?!


Cheers,

RR

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Timbo

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PostSubject: Re: In praise of English Cheese   Mon Feb 26, 2018 10:22 pm

Love me some good and bitey English cheddar as well as any goats or sheep cheese I've tried. Basically anything with a strong flavour gets me every time, English cheeses and baccy, curries and Asian food in general and my beer better have plenty of hops in it too. 

How's llama cheese Oz?

Now I'm starving, off to find lunch. 

Cheers

Tim
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huffelpuff

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PostSubject: Re: In praise of English Cheese   Mon Feb 26, 2018 11:09 pm

Last time I found Wensleydale they had it with apricots and with blueberries. The flavor went rather well with the apricot but I preferred the texture of the blueberries. Go figure lol. If I can't find any Wendslydale I'll usually pick up a brick of Ol' Croc. Really sharp Australian cheddar. Of course now I have a hankering for some nice ripe Stilton.

Jim
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Stick

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PostSubject: Re: In praise of English Cheese   Tue Mar 06, 2018 6:15 pm

Ahem... here your honour.

Goodness me, cheeses! Now there's something I didn't expect to read about on the BoB!

Cheddar is a family every day staple for us, the more mature the better. We have this with many of our meals, for example grated and sprinkled onto a chilli (that was us tonight) to give a creamy topping. A good stilton tends to be reserved for a cheese platter for after a main course, accompanied with other favourites such as brie and camembert - I do tend to favour a soft cheese, the stinkier and softer the better, and especially those from across the channel. And, err, every cheese platter wouldn't be the same without a splash of port...
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Brewdude
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PostSubject: Re: In praise of English Cheese   Tue Mar 06, 2018 9:49 pm

Ta very much for weighing in here mate.

Mature English Cheddar is clearly my fave, and what a splendid thing it was for me to renew this association!

Just now finished off my recent bounty, and had the Stilton tonight with some crispbread. Pure magic that was an' all!


cheers



Cheers,

RR

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swhipple

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PostSubject: Re: In praise of English Cheese   Tue Mar 06, 2018 11:41 pm

ummmm cheese. I love extra sharp cheddars no what where they may have been produced. My current favorite is 7 year aged from Ashe county cheese here in NC. It's wonderfully sharp with a salty tang. Thanks now I'm hungry. Very Happy
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DrT999

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PostSubject: Re: In praise of English Cheese   Wed Mar 07, 2018 9:04 am

My favorite English cheese is Cheshire: in the same family as a medium-sharp Cheddar, but it has a bit of a lovely tang as well. It probably lost out to Cheddar in part because it's a bit more crumbly and so doesn't slice as nicely, but I think it's a much better pairing with Tawney, Riesling, Cider, or lighter beers. YMMV
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Carlos
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PostSubject: Re: In praise of English Cheese   Wed Mar 07, 2018 10:07 am

I sometimes gotta have a bit of cheese.  I am a fan of a good Swiss.  Nutty and as pointed out earlier, squeaky on the teeth.

At Christmas and New Years, one of the in-laws had a soft sort of cheese on a platter with cranberries in it that was outstanding.  Some cheese other than cream cheese.  Sorry I do not know more than that. After a search, I wonder if it wasn't white Stilton with the cranberries.

Provolone is an occasional must for a sandwich.

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Brewdude
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PostSubject: Re: In praise of English Cheese   Wed Mar 07, 2018 8:44 pm

Stick wrote:
Ahem... here your honour.

Goodness me, cheeses!  Now there's something I didn't expect to read about on the BoB!

Cheddar is a family every day staple for us, the more mature the better.  We have this with many of our meals, for example grated and sprinkled onto a chilli (that was us tonight) to give a creamy topping.  A good stilton tends to be reserved for a cheese platter for after a main course, accompanied with other favourites such as brie and camembert - I do tend to favour a soft cheese, the stinkier and softer the better, and especially those from across the channel.  And, err, every cheese platter wouldn't be the same without a splash of port...

Right you are Guv'nor. Many Yanks don't recognize cheese as the final course after a good meal. And Stilton (the King of Cheese) fits this requirement perfectly! And I ate pretty much all the rest of my Stilton last eve, save for the bits with the rind. I'm saving those for tonight, as I have no problems with that.

As far as cheese from the continent, there are several very stinky cheeses from Belgium that go down a treat. Some smell downright repulsive, but are marvellous on the palate. I do have a good cheese story from a holiday in Brussels which I'll reserve for another time which involved a very stinky cheese!

And then of course there's Limburger from Germany. In a class of its own, that one. Stinky beyond belief, but put that on a good hearty black rye bread with freshly grated horseradish, sliced strong raw onions (red or white), really sour sauerkraut, and you have yourself a meal. I used to also include Braunschweiger (smoked German liver sausage), but not these days.

And finally, a good tawny Port would be the perfect foil to the cheese course.

Ah now, yer making me 'ungry an' all!





Cheers,

RR

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huffelpuff

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PostSubject: Re: In praise of English Cheese   Wed Mar 07, 2018 10:11 pm

Lol here I thought I was the only one that indulged in rind eating. Its actually my favorite part of a good cheese. I consider myself game for pretty much any cheese save one. There is a cheese in Italy of course it's illegal to make and sell now but apparently there is a thriving underground market for this stuff. What is it you ask.....I don't know the actual name but it's maggot cheese. When the cheese is young and fresh they remove a core from the middle and allow flys to do their business in the open core of the cheese. After a couple of days they bung the plug back in and away it goes to "ripen". I suspect my extreme aversion to this cheese probably stems from my working in a forensics lab for so long.

Jim
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Timbo

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PostSubject: Re: In praise of English Cheese   Thu Mar 08, 2018 9:09 pm

Casu Marzu sounds interesting to say the least Jim.

Cheers

Tim

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Casu_marzu
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Brewdude
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PostSubject: Re: In praise of English Cheese   Thu Mar 08, 2018 9:57 pm

huffelpuff wrote:
Lol here I thought I was the only one that indulged in rind eating. Its actually my favorite part of a good cheese. I consider myself game for pretty much any cheese save one. There is a cheese in Italy of course it's illegal to make and sell now but apparently there is a thriving underground market for this stuff. What is it you ask.....I don't know the actual name but it's maggot cheese. When the cheese is young and fresh they remove a core from the middle and allow flys to do their business in the open core of the cheese. After a couple of days they bung the plug back in and away it goes to "ripen". I suspect my extreme aversion to this cheese probably stems from my working in a forensics lab for so long.

Jim

That, is one cheese I'll be avoiding for all the obvious reasons, Jim!

affraid



Cheers,

RR

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